On Blogging Late

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Happy Spring!

I know, it’s a little late, but the tulips are just starting to bloom in Charlottetown. I think our weather is delayed by several weeks at this point… but things are surely looking up.

This week I’ve consistently blogged way past my normal hours. And it’s been pretty obvious from the lazy content that I’ve churned out. I think this was a good test, but now I see that my best content comes when my brain is still reasonably charged up.  I’ll be putting this to work in weeks to come!

My reason for blogging late tonight? Driving all around town trying to find an ice cream place open past 7pm. We ended up going to Jewell’s Country Market and finally saw their goats up on their crazy contraption.

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How cool is that?

Looking Back at my Younger Blogger #ThrowbackThursday

I couldn’t think of anything to write about this evening, so I decided to scroll back in the blog’s archives. That’s when I realized that three years ago, I posted about how to cope with being underemployed and overwhelmed. (First thing first, I love the use of under vs. over in the title.)

“Here’s the deal: It’s ok to feel overwhelmed! After-all, it’s your life and you want it to be amazing. But you can’t let the feeling take control! The time that you spend on over-thinking/worrying/stressing/being-generally-overwhelmed could be better used to push your job search forward.

It’s normal to feel overwhelmed at some (or many) points in your job search. And when you do, try taking a deep breath and remembering that you’re not alone.”

Watching the sunset from the top of Mauna Kea - now that's something worth being overwhelmed about!

Watching the sunset from the top of Mauna Kea – now that’s something worth being overwhelmed about!

What an unusual choice in photo!

I don’t know if I should critique this piece – I was a younger writer and I did indicate that I had been overwhelmed. I had been underemployed for almost a year; but I was trying my hardest not to feel sorry for myself. Unfortunately, I also seem to indicate that you can somehow just will yourself not to feel anxious or overwhelmed… well there’s the oversimplification of a lifetime!

But what I love about my old writing is that I actually try to come up with solutions. I still do that… everything is a list or a story.  My list three years ago reminds me of the little things that I did to try to succeed. It was a variety of different strategies that helped me to stay on track after university.

“You know what helped me to get past being overwhelmed?

  • Writing lists of things to-do and checking them off as I complete them :)
  • Having a friend/family member read through my resume and cover letter
  • Talking to a mentor or advisor and brainstorming ideas
  • Volunteering with organizations that I feel passionate about [or interning, both are worthwhile]
  • Spending some time in nature or participating in activities I love
  • Reading blog posts that inspire me [10 Mistakes Unhappy People Make, First Job Out of College (series), and Resume Bear: Interview Secrets We Should All Know About, just to name a few]
  • Practicing interview questions
  • Blogging, writing, journaling, and brainstorming new ways to get past unemployment”

It’s so weird to see what I’ve encountered over the past few years through my own eyes. Sometimes I even get the chance to learn from my own mistakes. My blog has provided me with so many memories; good and bad. I look forward to many more years of stories to tell.

And remember: “It’s ok to allow yourself to feel overwhelmed from time to time, but don’t let it stand in the way of your success.”

Ugh. Over simplification. I get myself every time!

Why we live here

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Sometimes I question our choice to move to PEI. The long winters and distance from home are frustrating. It’s not the bustling metropolis of Toronto, and doesn’t feel particularly familiar, yet there are some fantastic things here.

We do summer better here.

I’m used to the muggy Fredericton weather with nothing but lake water to cool us down. Or the unbearable Toronto summers full of overpriced everything and air conditioned dates. PEI has these beat without trying. The climate is a bit cooler, yet perfectly temperate, and the beaches are welcoming.

We’ve got golf, miles of trails, gardens, concerts, and festivals. There are events for every age, and new experiences to try.

On top of it all, family and friends flock to the Island. It’s like running a bed and breakfast for my favourite people in the world.

We do summer right on the Island – I look forward to sharing our third summer here.

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The Blogging Timeline

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As the night wanes on, I think it’s common to feel less and less confident in the content that you’re able to produce. I know that I do!

It’s nearly 9 pm, and I’m just sitting down to blog. This is far from the norm, since I like to get writing out-of-the-way immediately. But it’s also fits in well with my past few months; blogging daily has taught me to sit down and write, regardless of the hour or the ideas floating through my head.

If I hadn’t promised myself to write every day, I would likely just use this time to write some ideas and save them for tomorrow. Or better yet, to write a draft and review it in the morning over breakfast. Everything looks clearer with fresh eyes and after a day there’s really no room left for creativity or editing.

That said, writing at different hours is also a way to challenge yourself. Since every person is different, perhaps you’re a night owl. Perhaps your best work comes early in the day, or during your lunch break. Trying out a different writing schedule can put a fire behind you and give you an opportunity to surprise yourself.

For me, I think writing early in the day is best. This whole post sounds a bit flat!

Good night!!

Garden Journal – Gathering the Supplies

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I’ve been keeping track my garden for three summers now using a fairly simple journal. I make notes throughout the season and add in photos when I get the chance. Just one hook:

I never remember to print the photos.

Actually, I never remember to print any photos. It’s a problem of mine, similar to the fact that I dread taking photos, editing photos, and sorting through photos. I hate printing photos. I do like gluing them into books, however.

So this week one of my goals will be the get some photos from the last gardening season to compile into notebook pages. I got a touch lazy with maintaining the book last year, but I think that I can manage with the aid of Instagram photos. Which just proves that there is a purpose to Instagram! HA!

Anyway, I digress, the supplies for my DIY garden journal project:

  • A journal
  • Notes from the gardening season (ideally written at the time of entry)
  • Photos – as many as you can gather!
  • Graph paper – to plot your plants
  • Recipes
  • Mini calendar cutouts – to follow planting dates

Thinking about the mini calendar cutouts – I started using these last year for planting times, but stopped about halfway through the summer. I find the information particularly valuable this summer – I had no idea that we started planting on June 2nd last summer!

I can hardly wait to get started!

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May Writing Goals

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This month has flown by! Next week will be June… and for the first time (possibly ever) I’ve actually crossed all the things off my writing list before the end of a month!

I’ve got several vlog posts to throw together and a ton of ideas for future posts, so this tiny victory will be short-lived. Here’s to getting back to the drawing board once more!
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Patio Garden – Herbs for the Summer Ahead

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The garden season is almost here – there’s still a chill to the air on Prince Edward Island, but we’ll be planting things soon enough.

Today we decided to get our patio herbs going. We plant potted herbs for two reason: convenience (our garden is a kilometer from our home), and to prevent spreading throughout our plot. Herbs are notorious for spreading wildly, and as most as perennials, they really have no place in a community garden.

So we choose three patio herbs for the summer: Greek Oregano, Aristotle’s Basil, and English Thyme. I’ll share their progress from tiny plants to delicious additions to meals.

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